“I See You” Management

“I See You” Management, by Walter McIntyre

Connectivity between human beings is the beginning of synergy.  It is written in our genetic code and expresses itself in our drive to connect to others and be part of a group. Since this is how we are wired, it only makes sense that the most effective management styles, as far as us humans are concerned, leverages this aspect of our specie’s corporate psyche.

I would call this “I See You” management. I did not coin this phrase, but since I cannot remember who did, I will use it for this post. The way I see things, “I See You” management is based upon three levels of recognition.

“I See You” Management

Connectivity between human beings is the beginning of synergy.  It is written in our genetic code and expresses itself in our drive to connect to others and be part of a group. Since this is how we are wired, it only makes sense that the most effective management styles, as far as us humans are concerned, leverages this aspect of our specie’s corporate psyche.

I would call this “I See You” management. I did not coin this phrase, but since I cannot remember who did, I will use it for this post. The way I see thIngs, “I See You” management is based upon three levels of recognition.

Measuring things? Here’s a way to scare yourself.

Most people agree that measuring things is key for improvement. Most organizations have a basket of key measures on which they base their decision making. Pick a measure that’s regarded as important and spend a bit of time with one of the team that uses the measure (one-on-one, this isn’t about embarrassing people) and ask how they think that measure is calculated. Make sure you find out what they think is and isn’t included in the measure.

I’ve done this lots of times and have never once had two people come up with identical definitions (more often than not, they are nowhere near)

The 5 Deadly Sins of Management

The Know It All

The “Know It All” supervisor routinely challenges and overturns subordinate’s decisions. This approach to management will de-motivate others in the group, making them not want to make decisions or to make them behind the supervisor’s back. Supervisors that work this way will willingly take over decision making and, as a result, sub-optimize the work group.
I have had a supervisor that would always decide opposite my own decisions. It got so ridiculous that I began to present my own opinions opposite of what I really wanted in order to get him to decide the way I wanted him to. This creates a toxic work environment.